Blue and Yellow Fusilier [Caesio teres]

1 Caesio teres Blue and yellow fusilier

Blue and Yellow Fusilie, Caesio teres. Tail fin and peduncle, and body above a diagonal from just anterior to origin of dorsal fin to ventral origin of caudal peduncle bright yellow (except in large ones in western Pacific, yellow does not extend as far as anteriorly); rest of upper 2/3 of body bright blue; lower third silvery white. Indonesian populations have yellow from origin of dorsal and most of the back to below lateral line over the posterior part and tail. Indo-West Pacific: East Africa to the Line Islands.

 Pictures: Komodo, Indonesia by Sami Salmenkivi

Yellowtail fusilier [Caesio cuning]

1 Caesio cuning Yellowtail fusilier

Yellowtail fusilier, Caesio cuning. Upper body if not yellow, grayish blue; lower sides and belly white or pinkish. Pectoral, pelvic and anal fins white to pink. Large yellow tail. Dorsal fin yellow posteriorly and grayish blue anteriorly. Length usually at 35 cm.

 Pictures: Papua, Indonesia by Sami Salmenkivi

Ribbon eel [Rhinomuraena]

ribbon eel

The ribbon eelRhinomuraena quaesita, or Bernis eel, is a species of moray eel, the only member of the genus Rhinomuraena. What is now known as Rhinomuraena quaesita also includes the former Rhinomuraena amboinensisR. quaesita was used for blue ribbon eels and R. amboinensis for black ribbon eels, but these are now recognized as the same species. The ribbon eel is native to the Indo-Pacific ocean.

The ribbon eel is an elegant creature with a long, thin body and high dorsal fins. The ribbon eel can easily be recognised by its expanded anterior nostrils. Juveniles and sub-adults are jet black with a yellow dorsal fin, while females are yellow with a black anal fin with white margins on the fins. The adult males are blue with a yellow dorsal fin. The ribbon eel grows to an overall length of approximately 1 m (3.3 ft), and has a life span of up to twenty years. The ribbon eel is the only moray eel that is protandric.

 Pictures: Great Barrier Reef, Australia by Sami Salmenkivi

Arabian Angelfish [Pomacanthus asfur]

egypt-angelfish1

The Arabian angelfish, Pomacanthus asfur is a fish well known for its use in saltwater aquariums, even though it tends to be a shyer specimen compared to the other, sometimes aggressive, angelfish. The mother will lay the eggs in a scattered pattern so that the young wont fight for food and territory. (text: Wikipedia)

Pictures: Red Sea, Egypt by Sami Salmenkivi

Queen Angelfish [Holacanthus ciliaris]

mexico-queen-angelfish

The Queen Angelfish, Holacanthus ciliaris, is an angelfish commonly found near reefs in the warmer sections of the western Atlantic Ocean.

The adult Queen angelfish overall body color can be described as blue to bluegreen with yellow rims on its scales. Their pectoral fins and ventral fins are also yellow but their lips and the edges of their dorsal fins and anal fins are dark blue. Queen angelfish are also known to have blue markings around each gill cover. Juveniles have dark blue bodies with yellow lips, gills, and tail and vertical bars ranging in color from light blue to white. The Queen Angelfish may live up to 15 yrs in the wild and reach up to 45 centimetres in length.

The Queen Angelfish feeds primarily on sponges, but also feeds on tunicates, jellyfish, and corals as well as plankton and algae. Juveniles serve as “cleaners” and feed on the parasites of larger fish at cleaning stations. Although in home aquariums, aquarists have been successful in providing the Queen Angelfish a diet of meaty and algae based foods

Queen Angelfish inhabit reefs and are common near Florida, the Bahamas, and the Gulf of Mexico. It is rarely seen in the Bermuda Triangle and as far south as Brazil.

The adults are found in pairs year round, perhaps suggesting a long-term monogamous bond. The pairs reproduce by rising up in the water, bringing their bellies close together, and release clouds of sperm and eggs. The female can release anywhere from 25 to 75 thousand eggs each evening and as many as ten million eggs during each spawning cycle. The eggs are transparent, buoyant, and pelagic, floating in the water column. They hatch after 15 to 20 hours into larvae that lack effective eyes, fins, or even a gut. The large yolk sac is absorbed after 48 hours, during which time the larvae develop normal characteristics of free swimming fish. Larvae are found in the water column and feed on plankton. The larvae grow rapidly and about 3-4 weeks after hatching the 15-20mm long juvenile settles on the bottom. (Text: Wikipedia)

Pictures: Cozumel, Mexico by Sami Salmenkivi

Bicolor angelfish [centropyge bicolor]

1-centropyge-bicolor-bicolor-angelfish

The Bicolor angelfish (Centropyge bicolor) is a marine angelfish, with an easily recognisable yellow front and a dark blue rear completed with a yellow tail. This species is widely distributed in the South Pacific. The bicolor angel fish has a maximum size at just under 10 cm making it a relatively large member of the Centropyge (Dwarf Angelfish) genus. (text source: Wikipedia)

Pictures: Misool Islands, Raja Ampat, Papua, Indonesia by Sami Salmenkivi