Blue and Yellow Fusilier [Caesio teres]

1 Caesio teres Blue and yellow fusilier

Blue and Yellow Fusilie, Caesio teres. Tail fin and peduncle, and body above a diagonal from just anterior to origin of dorsal fin to ventral origin of caudal peduncle bright yellow (except in large ones in western Pacific, yellow does not extend as far as anteriorly); rest of upper 2/3 of body bright blue; lower third silvery white. Indonesian populations have yellow from origin of dorsal and most of the back to below lateral line over the posterior part and tail. Indo-West Pacific: East Africa to the Line Islands.

 Pictures: Komodo, Indonesia by Sami Salmenkivi

Spottailed Squirrelfish [Sargocentron caudimaculatum]

soldier fish

Spottailed Squirrelfish or Silverspot Squirrelfish, Sargocentron caudimaculatum is one of the most common of the squirrelfishes that occurs in outer reef areas, also encountered in lagoons and drop-offs from less than 2 to 40 m; either solitary or in groups. Nocturnal, feeds mainly on benthic crabs and shrimps.

 Pictures: Papua, Indonesia by Sami Salmenkivi

Fire Dartfish [Nemateleotris magnifica]

dartfish

The Fire Goby, Fire Fish, Fire Dartfish, or Red Fire Goby is a marine dartfish. This fish is most commonly found near the substrate of the upper reef in tropical marine waters. These waters include the Indo-Pacific, Central Pacific, east African waters, Ryukyu Islands, Japan, New Caledonia, and Pitcairn Islands.[1] They swim as deep below the surface as 70 meters, and usually hover directly above the ocean floor, facing the current to catch their prey.[1] They eat mostly copepods, zooplankton, and crustacean larvae. They usually have a bright yellow head, merging into a white body, gradually shading into a red-orange tail. Their dorsal fins are very long, and the fish flicks it back and forth. This is used as a signal to conspecifics. As a full grown adult, it reaches a maximum length of 9 centimeters (3 in). Adults occupy sandy burrows alone or in pairs, while the juveniles live in small groups. These fish are monogamous. They will retreat to burrows if threatened.

 Pictures: Phillipines by Sami Salmenkivi

Striped Eel Catfish [Plotosus lineatus]

00 catfish

Plotosus lineatus, common name Striped eel catfish, is a species of eeltail catfishes belonging to the family Plotosidae. Plotosus lineatus can reach a maximum length of 32 cm (13 in) in males.[1] The body is brown with cream-colored or white longitudinal bands. The most striking feature of this species is in the fins, in fact the second dorsal, caudal and anal are fused together as in eels. In the rest of the body is quite similar to a freshwater catfish: the mouth is surrounded by four pairs of barbels, four on the upper jaw and four on the lower jaw. The first dorsal and each of the pectoral fins have a highly venomous spine. They may even be fatal.[1]   Plotosus lineatus schooling in a ball. Juveniles of Plotosus lineatus form dense ball-shaped schools of about 100 fish, while adults are solitary or occur in smaller groups of around 20 and are known to hide under ledges during the day.[1] Adult P. lineatus search and stir the sand incessantly for crustaceans, mollusks, worms, and sometimes fish.[1] Striped eel catfish is an oviparous fish; this species has demersal eggs and planktonic larvae. This species has evolved long ampullary canals in its electrosensory organs.

 Pictures: Philippines by Sami Salmenkivi

Threeband pennantfish [Heniochus chrysostomus]

threeband pennantfish

Heniochus chrysostomus, common name Threeband pennantfish, is a tropical fish of the family Chaetodontidae. Heniochus chrysostomus can attain a maximum length of 18 centimetres (7.1 in) in males. The body is oval, laterally flattened, with a basic white color and three broad oblique brown bands. The first band runs from the forehead up to the pelvic fins, the second from the dorsal fin to the anal fin, the third is adjacent to the dorsal fin. The dorsal fin is elongated, in juveniles much more than in adults. Juvenile fishes are solitary. The snout tip is yellow. This species is oviparous and feeds on coral polyps. This species has an Indo-Pacific distribution, from Western India to Pitcairn Islands, Japan, southern Queensland, Micronesia and New Caledonia. Threeband pennantfish typically lives below the intertidal zone in coastal waters and in shallow water lagoon among the coral reefs, at a depth of 2–40 metres (6 ft 7 in–131 ft 3 in).

 Pictures: Papua, Indonesia by Sami Salmenkivi

Bird Wrasse [Gomphosus varius]

00 Cook 0 Bird wrasse?

Gomphosus varius is a species of wrasse native to the Indo-Pacific. Common names include bird-nose wrassebird wrassebrown bird wrasseolive club-nosed wrasse, and purple club-nosed wrasse. This fish reaches about 30 centimeters long. It lives around corals and feeds on crustaceans, fish, and molluscs.

 Pictures: Cook Islands by Sami Salmenkivi