Striped Large-eye Bream [Gnathodentex aureolineatus]

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Striped Large-eye Bream, Gnathodentex aureolineatus. Easily recognized from a yellow blotch on the back. Inhabits subtidal reef flats, lagoons, and seaward reefs. May be solitary or in groups. Sometimes forms aggregations of about a hundred or more individuals. Feeds at night on benthic invertebrates like crabs and gastropods, occasionally on small fish. Indo-Pacific: East Africa to the Tuamoto Islands (excluding the Hawaiian Islands), north to Japan, south to Australia. Recently reported from Norfolk Island. Wikipedia doesn’t have an article on this fish.

 Pictures: Cook Islands by Sami Salmenkivi

Bigeye Yellow Snapper [Lutjanus lutjanus]

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The Bigeye snapper or Bigeye Yellow Snapper, Lutjanus lutjanus, is a snapper in the family Lutjanidae found in the Indian Ocean and tropical western Pacific Ocean at depths of up to 96 m.

Its color is silver white with a yellow stripe from the eye to base of caudal fin. The fins are yellow. It reaches a maximum length of 35 cm.

The bigeye snapper is a highly prized, commercially trawled fish and generally fetches a high price in the marketplace.

 Pictures: Papua, Indonesia by Sami Salmenkivi

Blue and Yellow Fusilier [Caesio teres]

1 Caesio teres Blue and yellow fusilier

Blue and Yellow Fusilie, Caesio teres. Tail fin and peduncle, and body above a diagonal from just anterior to origin of dorsal fin to ventral origin of caudal peduncle bright yellow (except in large ones in western Pacific, yellow does not extend as far as anteriorly); rest of upper 2/3 of body bright blue; lower third silvery white. Indonesian populations have yellow from origin of dorsal and most of the back to below lateral line over the posterior part and tail. Indo-West Pacific: East Africa to the Line Islands.

 Pictures: Komodo, Indonesia by Sami Salmenkivi

Yellowtail fusilier [Caesio cuning]

1 Caesio cuning Yellowtail fusilier

Yellowtail fusilier, Caesio cuning. Upper body if not yellow, grayish blue; lower sides and belly white or pinkish. Pectoral, pelvic and anal fins white to pink. Large yellow tail. Dorsal fin yellow posteriorly and grayish blue anteriorly. Length usually at 35 cm.

 Pictures: Papua, Indonesia by Sami Salmenkivi

Dark-Banded Fusilier [Pterocaesio tile]

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Pterocaesio tile, common name Dark-banded fusilier, Blue-streak Fusilier, Bartail fusilier and Neon Fusilier, is a fish belonging to the family Caesionidae. Pterocaesio tile can reach a length of 25 centimetres (9.8 in). The back of the body is dark blue, while the flanks show a bluish green strike with a black stripe along the lateral line. The lower third of the body varies from white to pinkish. The lower half of the body turns bright red at night (hence the common name Neon Fusilier). It is oviparous and non-migratory. Pterocaesio tile feeds on zooplankton and is relatively rare.

 Pictures: Top: Australia, Bottom: Papua, Indonesia by Sami Salmenkivi

Yellowtail snapper [Ocyurus chrysurus]

The yellowtail snapper, Ocyurus chrysurus, is an abundant species of snapper found along the North American coast of the Atlantic Ocean. Although they have been found as far north as Massachusetts, their normal range is along Florida down through the West Indies and Brazil.

In certain reefs, most notably in the Florida Keys, this beautifully colored fish is commonly spotted among divers and snorkelers. The yellow tailed snapper is also a popular and abundant game fish that makes excellent table fare. Yellowtail feed on shrimp, crabs, worms and smaller fish. They spawn in groups off the edge of reefs from spring to fall, but heavily in midsummer. (text source: wikipedia)

Picture: Utila, Honduras by Sami Salmenkivi

Schoolmaster snapper [Lutjanus apodus]

The schoolmaster snapper, Lutjanus apodus, is found from Massachusetts to Brazil, but is common in southern Florida and the Caribbean. Up to 24 inches in length. It has a robust slightly compressed body, with a pointed head. Its color varies from silvery tp bronze. Fins and tails are yellow and the snout contains blue stripes. Lives in groups of dozens of subjects. Keeps a short distance from the seafloor at depths between 10 and 90 feet.

 Pictures: Cozumel, Mexico by Sami Salmenkivi