Boomerang Triggerfish [Sufflamen bursa]

00 Cook 0 picasso fish female?

Sufflamen bursa, also known as the Bursa, Scythe or Boomerang Triggerfish, is a Triggerfish from the Indo-Pacific. It occasionally makes its way into the aquarium trade. It grows to a size of 25 cm in length. “Scythe” markings on the tail of the triggerfish contain pigments which may change hue from light yellow to dark brown depending on mood of the fish.

 Pictures: Cook Islands by Sami Salmenkivi

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Picasso Triggerfish [Rhinecanthus aculeatus]

00 Cook 0 picasso fish

The lagoon triggerfish (Rhinecanthus aculeatus), also known as the blackbar triggerfish, the Picasso triggerfish, thePicassofish, and the Jamal, is a triggerfish, up to 30 cm in length, found on reefs in the Indo-Pacific region. The Hawaiian name for the fish, humuhumunukunukuāpuaʻa, (meaning “triggerfish with a snout like a pig”) shares the same name with the reef triggerfish, the state fish of Hawaii. This species has been studied in a range of research contexts, from locomotion to colour vision research.

 Pictures: taken at Cook Islands by Sami Salmenkivi

Clown triggerfish [Balistoides conspicillum]

The clown triggerfish, Balistoides conspicillum, is a triggerfish from the order Tetraodontiformes. This reef-associated fish is commonly found in the tropical Indo-Pacific and Red Sea.

This species is a primarily marine species. This fish is found in Tropical Indo-Pacific and Red Sea coastal waters from 1-75 metres in depth (3-250 ft). This fish is generally uncommon or rare throughout its range, which includes East Africa to South Africa, through to Indonesia, and all the way to Japan and New Caledonia. The clown triggerfish is most commonly found around coral reefs. It lives in clear coastal to outer reef habitats. It also occurs in clear, seaward reefs near steep drop-offs.

The fish can reach up to about 50 cm (20 in) in length.[1] It has strong jaws which can be used to crush and eat sea urchins, crustaceans and hard-shelled mollusks.

This fish has unique coloration. The ventral surface has large, white spots on a dark background, and its dorsal surface has black spots on yellow. There is a vertical, white (slightly yellow) stripe on the caudal fin. This fish has a form of camouflage that is, or is similar to, countershading. From below, the white spots look like the surface of the water above it. From above, the fish will blend in more with the coral reef environment. (text source: wikipedia)

Picture: Andaman&Nicobar, India by Sami Salmenkivi

Black triggerfish or Black durgon [Melichthys niger]

The black triggerfish, Melichthys niger, called Humuhumu’ele’ele in Hawaiian, is a blimp-shaped triggerfish with bright white lines running along its dorsal and anal fins. When in the water, it appears to be completely black. However, if it is taken out and exposed to bright light, one can see that it is actually of a dark-blue/green coloration.

Circumtropical. Hawaii, up through Polynesia, westward to the East Indies and across the Indian Ocean. The Black triggerfish is also located around the southern coast of Africa. (text source: wikipedia)

Picture: Cozumel, Mexico by Sami Salmenkivi

Titan Triggerfish [Balistoides viridescens]

The titan triggerfish, Balistoides viridescens, is the largest of the triggerfish species and can grow up to 75 cm in length (30 inches). Their range includes reef areas in the Indo-Pacific region, including Australia, Fiji, Thailand, Indonesia and the Maldives, also in the Red Sea. The fish is not a pelagic species and generally lives in the flat areas of the reef.

Titan triggerfish are the workers of the reef and often surrounded by other fish feeding from the leftovers.Titan triggerfish feed on shellfish, urchins, crustaceans and coral. They are the workers of the reef, often being busy turning over rocks, stirring up the sand and biting off pieces of branching coral. This is why one often sees other smaller fish species around it who feed from the left overs.

The fish can be very aggressive towards divers and snorkellers. Especially during reproduction season it is very territorial and will guard its nest, which it lays in a flat sandy area, vigorously against any intruders. Due to its size and strong teeth it can inflict serious injury. Bites may also be ciguatoxic. The Titan Triggerfish will not always bite, but can swim at snorkellers and divers escorting them out of their territory. When the males (most colourful) start swimming in your direction, the best thing to do is swim away backwards kicking your fins as a defence. Failure to do so may result in being bitten. (text source: wikipedia)

Picture: Red Sea, Egypt by Sami Salmenkivi