Common Clownfish [Amphiprion ocellaris]

The Ocellaris Clownfish, Common Clownfish or False Percula Clownfish (Amphiprion ocellaris) is a popular aquarium fish, even more so after it rose to stardom in Finding Nemo. It is very closely related to A. percula, the Orange Clownfish or “True Percula Clownfish”, and often lives in association with the sea anemone Heteractis magnifica, using them for shelter and protection. Generally, Ocellaris clownfish are hardier, and slightly less aggressive than its Percula counterpart. Both species are found in coral reefs of the Indo-Pacific, particularly in the Fiji and Tonga regions.

This clown anemonefish can be recognised by its orange colour with three white bars and black markings on the fins. It grows to about eight centimeters (three inches) in length. One can differentiate between Percula (true) and Ocellaris (false) by their respective colors and patterns. Ocellaris are usually less vibrantly colored, and have 11 dorsal fin-spines instead of 10, as on the Percula. There is also a rare melanistic variety hailing from the reefs around Darwin, Australia, that is a dark black colour with the normal white stripes. (text source: Wikipedia)

Pictures: Pulau Perhentian, Malaysia and Andaman, India by Sami Salmenkivi

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Needlefish

Needlefish is the family (Belonidae), but information on the different species cannot be found. But if you do know more, feel free to assist.

Needlefish (family Belonidae) are piscivorous fishes primarily associated with very deep marine habitats or the bottom of the open sea. Some genera include species found in marine, brackish, and freshwater environments (e.g., Strongylura) while a few genera are confined to freshwater rivers and streams, including Belonion, Potamorrhaphis, and Xenentodon. Needlefish closely resemble North American freshwater gars (family Lepisosteidae) in being elongate and having long, narrow jaws filled with sharp teeth, and some species of needlefish are referred to as gars or garfish despite being only distantly related to the true gars. Needlefish are in fact members of the Beloniformes and therefore most closely related to flying fish, sauries, and halfbeaks.

Picture: Pulau Redang, Malaysia by Sami Salmenkivi